THE INTELLECTUAL ROOTS OF TERROR a Book Review of the Black Book of Communism


My friend James Vaughn is always reminding us that “Liberalism is a Cult of Death” or words to that effect. With the 2012 election successfully hijacked and all of our votes stolen and rendered meaningless I decided it was time to read The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression • By Stéphane Courtois and Mark Kramer • Harvard University Press, 1999, a definite page turner to say the least and very very powerful in ways that can’t be described by reasonable virtuous people. While I was researching other reader’s reaction to this book I happened upon a review by James Ostrowski at the Ludwig von Mises Institute website that I thought was exceptional…here it is for your enjoyment. Ultimately, the history of the left and communism and liberalism agree with both James Ostrowski and James Vaughn ..they are both cults of death!

THE INTELLECTUAL ROOTS OF TERROR

James Ostrowski Mises.org

As zebras are fascinated by lions, libertarians are fascinated by communists, their polar opposites and sworn enemies for the last 150 years. If one believes that society should function with an absolute minimum of governmental coercion, one is curious to know the results of a philosophy which places its faith in the maximum possible use of governmental coercion, force, and violence, to achieve its goals. If communism worked, we libertarians would be forced to check our premises and watch our backs.

Can the laboratory of communism also shed light on the viability of a related political philosophy, which also relies on centralized governmental coercion to achieve its goals: modern liberalism? The communists did all at once what stealthy left-liberals apparently intend to do piece by piece while we sleep. We just lived through a century in which liberals enacted several recommendations of the Communist Manifesto and transformed a night-watchman state into a welfare/warfare state with a continual flow of “progressive” legislation and various “Democrat wars” and crusades with the result that no one in my law school class in 1983 could identify, in response to Professor Henry Mark Holzer’s query, any aspect of life that was not in some way regulated or controlled by the state. Seventeen years later, are they through?

Has liberalism closed up shop? Will they ever be through? Not until they have established an egalitarian utopia where virtually all responsibility for living has passed from the individual to the state. In the liberal utopia, if I may pilfer Paddy Chayefsky’s words, “all necessities [will be] provided, all anxieties tranquilized, all boredom amused.”

If you think I exaggerate, consider that liberals and communists share five critical premises: egalitarianism, utopianism (the use of impossible “ideals” as a guide to policy), the efficacy of force in accomplishing positive goals, hostility to civil society (nonstate institutions, e.g., Boy Scouts, private schools), and the individual’s inability to govern himself.

In light of the recent attempted coup d’élection, I am tempted to add a sixth similarity — willingness to win political fights at all costs. Further evidence of some basic affinity between communism and modern liberalism is the latter’s frequent coverups and apologies for the former. Finally, communists and liberals share a tendency to expressly support “mass democracy” while they in practice concentrate power in secretive elite bodies such as politburos and appellate courts.

The Black Book
In that spirit of fascination with the enemy, I recently read The Black Book of Communism, a clinical and relentless dissection of the crimes of communism in the 20th century — defined by “the natural laws of humanity” — written by several ex–fellow travelers led by Stephane Courtois.

It is not a book to be read before, during, or after a meal. You would not want to spoil a good meal with the image of Bolshevik troops throwing live human beings into a blast furnace. The Black Book is a story of mind-numbing and mindless brutality. Mao Zedong, one of the stars of the book, said, “political power grows out of the barrel of a gun.”

One wonders, after reading this book, whether political power actually grows out of the depraved minds of solipsistic, megalomaniacs like Lenin, Stalin, and Mao. It seems that if you hypnotize yourself into discarding all known ethics and morality, and are willing to use any and all ruthless means to achieve power, then you can have it. A Bolshevik newspaper wrote in 1919, “Our morality has no precedent … everything is permitted … Let blood flow like water.” And it did. Continue reading this great review at it’s source (click)http://mises.org/daily/574

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One response to “THE INTELLECTUAL ROOTS OF TERROR a Book Review of the Black Book of Communism

  1. The core principle of council communism is that the government and the economy should be managed by workers’ councils composed of delegates elected at workplaces and recallable at any moment. As such, council communists oppose state-run authoritarian ” State socialism “/” State capitalism “. They also oppose the idea of a “revolutionary party”, since council communists believe that a revolution led by a party will necessarily produce a party dictatorship. Council communists support a worker’s democracy, which they want to produce through a federation of workers’ councils.

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